Looking Back


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 
Jan 042012
 

By Francie Payne– July The Wallow fire, Arizona’s largest on record at 522,642 acres, plus 15,407 acres in New Mexico, was 95 percent controlled as of July 1. The Holbrook City Council commissioned a flow study to analyze the capacity of the city’s existing sewer system as part of its evaluation of infrastructure to see Read More…

Dec 302011
 
Hashknife Cowboys

Photo courtesy of the Navajo County Historical Society These Hashknife Cowboys, pictured in Holbrook circa 1900, are part of the early association of the Hashknife brand, when the infamous “Hashknife outfit” was known for its 60,000 head of cattle and “the unsavory reputation of having ‘the thievinist, fightinest’ bunch of cowboys in the United States,” Read More…

Dec 232011
 
Looking Back

Photo courtesy of the Old Trail Museum Winslow’s historic records indicate that this was W.A. Parr’s first car. A contractor, mortician and civic leader, Parr served two terms in the Territorial Assembly and, after statehood, one term as a state senator. Enjoying the ride are (left to right) Frona Parr, Mrs. Heiser, Hattie Hohn, Minnie Read More…

Dec 162011
 
Arizona Cooperative Mercantile Institution

Photo courtesy of the Navajo County Historical Society After the legendary fire of 1888 swept through Holbrook, the Arizona Cooperative Mercantile Institution relocated along what is now Bucket of Blood Street. The store was part of the Mormon Cooperative Stores of the time, which allowed community members the opportunity to reap the benefits of jointly Read More…

Dec 092011
 
1880s Winslow Depot

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Museum The Winslow Depot was built in the early 1880s, and included a dining room for travelers on the train. The structure was built of wood, and was located between Williamson and Kinsley avenues north of the main line with a rail spur access. The building was lost when Read More…

Nov 112011
 
Second and Kinsley--Winslow, 1900s

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Museum This photo was taken at the intersection of Second Street and Kinsley Avenue in the early 1900s. On the right side is the Dagg Mercantile Building, one of the first brick structures in Winslow. It was a western wear clothing store when it burned in 1992, and the Read More…

Nov 092011
 
‘Logs To Lumber’ Presentation Is Slated Saturday In Winslow

The Winslow Historical Society will present Logs to Lumber from 2 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 12, at the Winslow Visitors Center in the former Hubbell Trading Post, 523 W. Second St. Former Ramsey Logging Company employees Jim and Marilee Ervien, Nick Paul and John Smith will explore the histories of local lumber companies, Read More…

Nov 042011
 
The Ellis Boys Band--1912

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Museum The Ellis Boys Band (photo circa 1912) was a popular group of young men that often entertained in Winslow’s early days. Their concerts were held in the gazebo that stood for many years at the intersection of First Street and Kinsley Avenue. The townspeople helped them raise money Read More…

Oct 282011
 
Dyer Grocery

Photo courtesy of the Navajo County Historical Society Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Dyer owned and operated the White Grocery in Holbrook in the early 1900s. In “Images of America: Holbrook and the Petrified Forest,” author Catherine H. Ellis said of the store, “All soups were the same price, so many in the community ate vegetable Read More…

Oct 212011
 
"Lawman Ketchum, Who Sure Can Catch 'Em"

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Museum A well-known man around Winslow for many years was Benjamin Franklin Ketchum, known as Frank, who was often called upon to extract automobiles from the Little Colorado River. While serving as town marshal in the early 1900s, Ketchum was involved in a notorious shooting that prompted his reputation Read More…

Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin