Looking Back


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Dec 092011
 
1880s Winslow Depot

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Museum The Winslow Depot was built in the early 1880s, and included a dining room for travelers on the train. The structure was built of wood, and was located between Williamson and Kinsley avenues north of the main line with a rail spur access. The building was lost when Read More…

Nov 112011
 
Second and Kinsley--Winslow, 1900s

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Museum This photo was taken at the intersection of Second Street and Kinsley Avenue in the early 1900s. On the right side is the Dagg Mercantile Building, one of the first brick structures in Winslow. It was a western wear clothing store when it burned in 1992, and the Read More…

Nov 092011
 
‘Logs To Lumber’ Presentation Is Slated Saturday In Winslow

The Winslow Historical Society will present Logs to Lumber from 2 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 12, at the Winslow Visitors Center in the former Hubbell Trading Post, 523 W. Second St. Former Ramsey Logging Company employees Jim and Marilee Ervien, Nick Paul and John Smith will explore the histories of local lumber companies, Read More…

Nov 042011
 
The Ellis Boys Band--1912

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Museum The Ellis Boys Band (photo circa 1912) was a popular group of young men that often entertained in Winslow’s early days. Their concerts were held in the gazebo that stood for many years at the intersection of First Street and Kinsley Avenue. The townspeople helped them raise money Read More…

Oct 282011
 
Dyer Grocery

Photo courtesy of the Navajo County Historical Society Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Dyer owned and operated the White Grocery in Holbrook in the early 1900s. In “Images of America: Holbrook and the Petrified Forest,” author Catherine H. Ellis said of the store, “All soups were the same price, so many in the community ate vegetable Read More…

Oct 212011
 
"Lawman Ketchum, Who Sure Can Catch 'Em"

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Museum A well-known man around Winslow for many years was Benjamin Franklin Ketchum, known as Frank, who was often called upon to extract automobiles from the Little Colorado River. While serving as town marshal in the early 1900s, Ketchum was involved in a notorious shooting that prompted his reputation Read More…

Oct 072011
 
Looking Back: Troutner's Store For Men

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Musuem Troutner’s Store for Men was an institution on Route 66. It dominated Second Street in downtown Winslow beginning in 1943 when Wayne L. Troutner opened a dry cleaning shop. His curvy cowgirl signs were placed all over the country, prompting thousands of curious tourists to seek his place Read More…

Oct 052011
 
‘Sawbones And Stethoscopes’ Offers View Of Medicine In Early Winslow

  The Winslow Historical Society will present “The Sawbones and Stethoscopes that Kept ‘em Standin’ on the Corner” from 2 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 8, at the Winslow Visitors Center/Hubbell Trading Post, located at 523 W. Second St. Historical Society members Barb Larremore and Vel Marcotte will present the program, which will feature Read More…

Sep 302011
 
Holbrook High School's Old Main-- 1928

Photo courtesy of the Navajo County Historical Society Holbrook High School’s Old Main, pictured here in 1928, had that iconic educational institution character typical of schools in the early to mid-20th century era. Members of the last class to complete their four-year high school education at Old Main graduated in the spring of 1979, just Read More…

Sep 232011
 
Winslow's Own Blues Boy

Photo courtesy of the Old Trails Museum At the age of 10, Winslow’s own blues boy, Tommy Dukes, relocated to the area from the state of Mississippi. His musical career, which started at age 13, has resulted in several album recordings, as well as a spot in the Arizona Blues Hall of Fame. Dukes will Read More…

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